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Whatever happened to sanitation : practical steps to achieving a core development goal

This paper provides specific suggestions for moving sanitation up on the agenda of policy makers. It links the sanitation campaigns of 19th century Britain to today's international calls for improved access to sanitation. The paper emphasizes that we first need to define what sanitation means, set short and long term priorities for action and then find out where the money can be found. By focusing on household sanitation and the required institutional arrangements, it looks at the advantages of incorporating sanitation into the wider process of development at the local level. If sanitation is to be scaled up this implies a new role for government. It will also require: institutional transformation; a focus on household behaviours; a push to increase demand for sanitation; an increased range of technologies and choices; improving the effectiveness of subsidies in sanitation and hygiene promotion; and more money. The paper concludes with lessons that can be learned from HIV/AIDS campaigns and a set of key messages for sanitation promotion.

TitleWhatever happened to sanitation : practical steps to achieving a core development goal
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsEvans, B.
Pagination22 p. : 2 fig.
Date Published2004-03-01
PublisherUnited Nations Millennium Development Task Force on Water and Sanitation
Place PublishedNew York, NY, USA
Keywordsaccess to sanitation, behaviour, financing, household hygiene, institutional aspects, policies, sdipol, sdisan, uemk
Abstract

This paper provides specific suggestions for moving sanitation up on the agenda of policy makers. It links the sanitation campaigns of 19th century Britain to today's international calls for improved access to sanitation. The paper emphasizes that we first need to define what sanitation means, set short and long term priorities for action and then find out where the money can be found. By focusing on household sanitation and the required institutional arrangements, it looks at the advantages of incorporating sanitation into the wider process of development at the local level. If sanitation is to be scaled up this implies a new role for government. It will also require: institutional transformation; a focus on household behaviours; a push to increase demand for sanitation; an increased range of technologies and choices; improving the effectiveness of subsidies in sanitation and hygiene promotion; and more money. The paper concludes with lessons that can be learned from HIV/AIDS campaigns and a set of key messages for sanitation promotion.

Custom 1302.2, 302.3, 302.5

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