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IRC’s support for improved service planning in municipalities in the Sahel region

Rural water service management reform has been taking place in the Sahel region since 2008. It has defined the roles and responsibilities of the service authority and operators responsible for the water supply service. It has also set up an operational framework for water users’ associations (WUA) and local operators to run village water supply services. IRC Burkina Faso has reviewed the performance of existing institutions and, in particular, their overarching regulatory framework.

The regulatory framework also defines the obligations of the WUAs. The WUAs have three main responsibilities, which include coordinating water point managers and local mechanics, as well as cash management, such as collecting tariffs and remunerating local service providers. Although not identified as such in the regulations, a third, cross-cutting, responsibility is that of user representation. Although the regulations are now in place, how have they been implemented? What are the gaps and how can these be addressed? What results have been achieved? This report describes the main progress made by two municipalities in the Sahel: Aribinda and Gorgadji.

TitleIRC’s support for improved service planning in municipalities in the Sahel region
Publication TypeResearch Report
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsIRC Burkina Faso
Pagination21
Date Published07/2015
PublisherIRC Burkina Faso
Place PublishedOuagadougou, Burkina Faso
Publication LanguageEnglish
Abstract

Rural water service management reform has been taking place in the Sahel region since 2008. It has defined the roles and responsibilities of the service authority and operators responsible for the water supply service. It has also set up an operational framework for water users’ associations (WUA) and local operators to run village water supply services. IRC Burkina Faso has reviewed the performance of existing institutions and, in particular, their overarching regulatory framework.

The regulatory framework also defines the obligations of the WUAs. The WUAs have three main responsibilities, which include coordinating water point managers and local mechanics, as well as cash management, such as collecting tariffs and remunerating local service providers. Although not identified as such in the regulations, a third, cross-cutting, responsibility is that of user representation. Although the regulations are now in place, how have they been implemented? What are the gaps and how can these be addressed? What results have been achieved? This report describes the main progress made by two municipalities in the Sahel: Aribinda and Gorgadji.

Citation Key79900