Skip to main content

Global water policy and local payment choices in rural Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa is least likely to meet the Sustainable Development Goal for safely-managed drinking water. Africa is estimated to require at least three times more annual investment, as a share of the gross regional product, than any other region to achieve ‘basic’ drinking water for everyone by 2030. If rural water users are to share some of these costs then the performance of current services needs to improve. In Africa, when a rural waterpoint fails, it takes a month or more to repair. We model water user choices across maintenance service models delivered by public, private and community providers with trade-offs in speed of repairing faults, payment levels and cash management. We find higher payments are associated with higher education and faster repair times. Household wealth, sex of respondent, seasonality, and waterpoint congestion, reliability and quality all influence payment choices. Understanding local payment choices provide behavioural clues to design more sustainable funding and service delivery models to align global and local drinking water goals. [author abstract]

TitleGlobal water policy and local payment choices in rural Africa
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsHope, R., Ballon, P.
Secondary Titlenpj Clean Water
Volume2
Issue1
Pagination1-9 : 5 fig, 1 tab.
Date Published11/2019
Publication LanguageEnglish
ISBN Number2059-7037
Abstract

Sub-Saharan Africa is least likely to meet the Sustainable Development Goal for safely-managed drinking water. Africa is estimated to require at least three times more annual investment, as a share of the gross regional product, than any other region to achieve ‘basic’ drinking water for everyone by 2030. If rural water users are to share some of these costs then the performance of current services needs to improve. In Africa, when a rural waterpoint fails, it takes a month or more to repair. We model water user choices across maintenance service models delivered by public, private and community providers with trade-offs in speed of repairing faults, payment levels and cash management. We find higher payments are associated with higher education and faster repair times. Household wealth, sex of respondent, seasonality, and waterpoint congestion, reliability and quality all influence payment choices. Understanding local payment choices provide behavioural clues to design more sustainable funding and service delivery models to align global and local drinking water goals. [author abstract]

Notes

Includes 40 ref.

DOI10.1038/s41545-019-0045-y
Short Titlenpj Clean Water